Brewing Turkish Coffee

August 08, 2010

Turkish Coffee

Turkish coffee is a sweet, fragrant, and full-bodied brew that is very popular in the Mediterranean region and Middle East. Most coffee historians agree this style of coffee got its start in Egypt during the 16th century. Turkish coffee brews without a filter or strainer – if you like a French press for the “body” imparted be the unfiltered fines, then get ready to be blown away by this stuff. Sugar is part of the recipe for a reason – this thick, syrupy, and bold coffee is a style like no other.





The Ibrik Brewer

Turkish coffee is brewed in a ibrik. The ibrik looks like a small brass or copper pot with a handle sticking out the side. These brewers can vary in size, but the shape and the function remains the same. The basics for this method sounds familiar: put coffee and water in the pot, add heat (there might be a bit more to it then that), brew, and serve. A quick web search shows the ibrik is often decorated and packaged with matching cups. similar to the way tea pots and cups are commonly sold in sets.





Turkish Ground Coffee

The secret to really great Turkish coffee rests in the grind. The grounds should be like powder when you are finished grinding. There are brass hand mills available designed to create this powder for Turkish coffee, but The Hario Skerton (now available on ROASTe) can get this job done with out much fuss. Adjust this grinder till the burrs almost touch and you should end up with coffee powder suitable for Turkish coffee.





Brewing Turkish Coffee

Turkish coffee brews fast! Once you grind the beans it takes only a couple minutes to brew up someTurkish style java:





  1. Scoop two teaspoons of your coffee powder per cup into the ibrik .
  2. Spices like cardamom or cinnamon can spice up the pot if you like. If you add spices, be sure to grind them very fine like the coffee and add to the grounds before brewing.
  3. Add two teaspoons of coffee and two teaspoons of sugar per cup and add water to begin dissolving the sugar.
  4. Heat the pot on an open flame or stove top. As the coffee reaches a boil it will begin to foam. Take the pot away from the heat source once the foam moves toward the top of the ibrik.
  5. Heat the ibrik until it boils up toward the top of the pot for a second time.
  6. Let the coffee to sit for a bit so the grounds can settle, then pour into your cup.
  7. Enjoy!


Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in The Reading Room

5 Simple Steps To Maintain and Clean Your Baratza Encore Grinder
5 Simple Steps To Maintain and Clean Your Baratza Encore Grinder

October 26, 2017

Read More
Your Ultimate Coffee Glossary: A Helpful List of Terms
Your Ultimate Coffee Glossary: A Helpful List of Terms

September 27, 2017

Here are some common terms you’re likely to run into whether you’re fresh on the coffee scene or just dabbling in a new area of interest.
Read More
3 Women Pioneers in the Coffee Roasting Business
3 Women Pioneers in the Coffee Roasting Business

August 02, 2017

Read More

GET 10% OFF YOUR FIRST ORDER